KLINGER


Statek U Kořínků
" U Kořínků "
[ photographed 11 August 1942 ]


Questions, Comments, or Updates? Email: levi@czechroots.net

LEGEND:
  = Link to picture
 = Link to vital record, police conscription record, newspaper announcement, or other document
 = Link to Shoah-related document or image
= Link to graphical family tree
{ nnnn } = Where nnnn = unconfirmed family member and/or relationship
( yyyy ) = where yyyy = year or date of birth, to distinguish between people who have the same name
[ My xxxx ] = Relationship to me: where xxxx = GGF = Great-grandfather, 3xGGM = Great-great-great-grandmother, etc.

Updated 29 June 2017


Klinger, Abraham [My 5xGGF]
Klinger, Anton
Klinger, Arnošt
Klinger, Artur
Klinger, Bernard
Klinger, Elias
Klinger, Emil
Klinger, Ferdinand
Klinger, František (1898)
Klinger, František (1910)
Klinger, František (1915)
Klinger, Gustav
Klinger, Gustav Zdeněk
Klinger, Hanuš
Klinger, Hermann
Klinger, Hugo (1877)
Klinger, Hugo (1886)
Klinger, Jakob (1783) [My 4xGGF ]
Klinger, Jakob (1849)
Klinger, Jan
Klinger, Josef (?)
Klinger, Josef (1821)
Klinger, Josef (1850)
Klinger, Josef (1851) [ My 2xGGF ]
Klinger, Josef (1883)
Klinger, Josef (1907)
Klinger, Josef (1929)
Klinger, Karel (1847)
Klinger, Karel (1919)
Klinger, Karel (aka Charles Keith)
Klinger, Lazar
Klinger, Leopold (1819) [ My 3xGGF ]
Klinger, Leopold (1890)
Klinger, Ludvik
Klinger, (Newborn)
Klinger, Otto (1889)
Klinger, Otto (1915)
Klinger, Paul
Klinger, Phillip
Klinger, Pinkas
Klinger, Rudolf (1876)
Klinger, Rudolf (1881) [ My GGF ]
Klinger, Rudolf (1917)
Klinger, Steven
Klinger, Zdeněk
Klingerová, Anna (1817)
Klingerová, Anna (1826)
Klingerová, Anna (1858)
Klingerová, Anthea
Klingerová, Berta
Klingerová, Edita
Klingerová, Emilie
Klingerová, Františka
Klingerová, Gertrude
Klingerová, Helen
Klingerová, Helena
Klingerová, Hermine (1872)
Klingerová, Hermine (1887)
Klingerová, Irma (1891)
Klingerová, Irma (1905)
Klingerová, Kamilla (1879)
Klingerová, Kamilla (1909) [ My GM ]
Klingerová, Lisa
Klingerová, Mariana
Klingerová, Marie (1846)
Klingerová, Marie (1920)
Klingerová, Miluška
Klingerová, Olga (1885)
Klingerová, Olga (1890)
Klingerová, Pauline
Klingerová, Rosa
Klingerová, Rosia
Klingerová, Tatjana
Klingerová, Trude
Klingerová, Zdeňka (1903)
Klingerová, Zdeňka (1911)
Klingerova, Zdeňka (1922)


Klinger, Anton [ b. 19.8.1893, Karlín 226 (Prague) - d. ? ]
Anton was the youngest child of Karel and Marie (née Lustigová) Klinger. He married Anna Freundová at the Hotel Palace in Prague on 28 December 1919. Note that while his birth record names him Anton, the marriage record lists him as Antonin. It's not currently clear whether they had any children, but the Czech Holocaust archive have revealed there may have been two - Jan and Tatjana. Anton's fate is currently unconfirmed, but there is a chance that he went to England in 1939 as part of a Britsh program to resettle Czech refugees. His wife and their two presumable children were all lost in the Holocaust.

Parents:
Klinger, Karel (1847)
Lustigová, Marie (1849)

Spouse(s):
Freundová, Anna

Children:
Klinger, Jan
Klingerová, Tatjana


Klinger, Artur [ b. 4.2.1885, Kouřim, Bohemia - d. 1944, Auschwitz, Poland ] Police Conscription Document Police Conscription Document
Arthur was one of 14 children belonging to Karel and Marie (née Lustigová) Klinger. His personal Prague residency document does not show him as married because it was recorded when he was only 18, indicating that he had struck out on his own at that tender age. Artur first married Gusti Kleinová of Klučov on 7 June 1914. He had two sons with Gusti before she passed away from pneumonia at only 24 years of age - less than one week after the birth of their second son Gustav Zdeněk. He later remarried to Irma Faktorová on 8 December 1919, and they had a daughter - Miluška. Four of the immediate family members were lost in the Holocaust, but Miluška's fate is not known at this time. Last residence: Boleslavská 4, Prague. Note: Klučov is not far from Pečky where Artur's brother Hugo lived.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: XII
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: XII., Bunzlauer Strasse 4 [XII., Boleslavská 4], c/o Taussig
transport AAs-759 (20.07.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Et-1210 (23.10.1944 Terezín -> Osvětim)

Parents:
Klinger, Karel (1847)
Lustigová, Marie (1849)

Spouse(s):
Kleinová, Gusti (deceased)
Faktorová, Irma

Children:
Klinger, Gustav Zdeněk
Klinger, Ota
Klingerová, Miluška


Klinger, Arnošt [ b. 20.10.1896, Vršovice 18 (Prague) - d. 26.1.1943, Auschwitz, Poland ]  Photograph Police Conscription Document Deportation Card rt record - Page 1/2 rt record - Page 2/2
Arnošt, the youngest of 8 children, was a butcher in Prague - like his father.  His Brit Mila took place on 27.10.1896 in his parents' home at Vršovice 18 in Vinohrady - a small estate in Prague known as "U Kořínků" which translates to "At the Roots." He married Irma Fischelová and together they had at least two children. His son Josef was born just weeks after the death of his father, and was named for him per traditional Jewish practice.  Notes: What was generically Vršovice 18 (really Přemyslova 18) is now actually Vršovice 490 on Charkovská street. Note the deportation transports to Auschwitz on 26.1.1943 are considered death transports because almost nobody on those transports survived the Shoah - most were "selected" for death in the gas chambers upon arrival at Auschwitz. Last residence: Přemyslova 18 - "U Kořínků," Prague.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: XIII
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: XII., Prschemyslidenstrasse 10 [XII., Přemyslovská 10]
transport Bf-461 (08.09.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Cs-886 (26.01.1943 Terezín -> Osvětim)
Note: The above last-address information from the Czech Holocaust archive is incorrect.

Parents:
Klinger, Josef (1851)
Fischelová, Marie (1854)

Spouse(s):
Fischelová, Irma

Children:
Klinger, Helena
Klinger, Josef (1929)


Klinger, Emil [ b. c. 1879, Třebovle, Bohemia - d. 30.4.1932, Kluky, Bohemia ] Police Conscription Document Obituary, Prager Tagblatt, 1 May 1932
One of 14 children of Karel and Marie (née Lustigová) Klinger. Emil was a tenant farmer (Gutspächter) in Kluky, a town outside of Pisek in southern Bohemia. He married Kamilla Hermannová and together they had three children. His obituary indicates he died in Kluky but was buried in the Časlav Jewish cemetery - nearly halfway across Bohemia from Písek. Basic research reveals both his wife and sons Josef & František were lost in the Holocaust. The fate of his daughter is unknown at this time. No further information is currently available.

Parents:
Klinger, Karel (1847)
Lustigová, Marie (1849)

Spouse(s):
Hermannová, Kamilla

Children:
Klinger, Josef (1907)
Klinger, František (1910)
Klingerová, Františka

Klinger, František (1915) [ b. 15.5.1915, Vršovice (Prague) - d. 31.3.1945, Buchenwald, Germany ] Deportation Card "Personal" card issued at concentration camp Buchenwald "Labor" card issued at concentration camp Buchenwald "Office" card issued at concentration camp Buchenwald "Numeral" card issued at concentration camp Buchenwald "Numeral" card issued at concentration camp Buchenwald
František was the eldest of my grandmother's three brothers. Their parents were Rudolf and Milada (née Oesterreicherová) Klinger. František was most likely born at Ruská 20/562, but it's possible that he was born elsewhere in Prague. Prior to the war, František shared a flat with his brother Karel in Prague, but he was arrested and deported almost two months earlier than Karel. Like his grandfather and a number of other relatives, František was a butcher.. He was arrested by the Gestapo in Prague on 24 November 1941 and deported immediately to the Terezín concentration camp - he was among the earliest known deportations of Czech Jews to Terezín, on the so-called "Aufbaukommando" transports, and the only known "Ak" transportee in the entire family tree. The Ak deportees were ordered to help the Nazis construct the camp and ghetto at Terezín; as a result of this "special" status, they were apparently afforded some leeway and influence in the camp.

František married Elly Bocková while in the Terezín ghetto on 12 June 1942. Elly survived the Holocaust and emigrated to Israel. František languished in Terezín for nearly three years before being deported to Auschwitz on 1 October 1944. Shortly following his arrival in Auschwitz in October 1944, František was quickly deported west to Groß-Rosen, from where he was finally sent to Buchenwald - held as a slave laborer, forced to support the Nazi war effort in the late days of the way. He died there on 31 March 1945, shortly before the Allies liberated that camp - probably from severe illness or on one of the so-called death marches.

Here is František's ostensible chain of movements from initial deportation to his death:

Prague →  Terezín :  24 November 1941, with the Aufbaukommando (note the "Ak-1" on the deportation card)
Terezín →  Auschwitz  : 1 October 1944
Auschwitz  →  Groß-Rosen  :  Unknown (date of transfer not recorded), but definitely very soon after arrival in Auschwitz
Groß-Rosen  →  Buchenwald  : Unknown (date of transfer not recorded); arrived Buchenwald 10 February 1945  
Death: Probably 31 March 1945; cause or circumstances of death not recorded.

Some notes on the Ak-1 and Ak-2 transports, taken from the "History of Ghetto Theresienstadt" page:

The first Jews, who were brought to Theresienstadt on November 24, 1941, were 342 men who were housed in the Sudeten barracks on the west side of the old garrison, from where one can see the Sudeten mountain range near the border between Germany and the Czech Republic. This first transport, called the Aufbaukommando, was brought there to prepare the 10 barracks buildings for the rest of the Jews who would soon follow. On December 4, 1941 another transport of 1,000 Jews who were to form the Jewish "self-government" of the ghetto was sent to Theresienstadt. These two early transports became known as AK1 and AK2.


Last residence uncertain, but probably: Pod Pekařkou 425/12, Prague, with his brother Karel. Their villa is still there - the modern address is Podolí 425.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: XV
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: XV., Peter-Aspelt-Strasse 425 [XV., Pod Pekařkou 425]
transport Ak-73 (24.11.1941 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Em-735 (01.10.1944 Terezín -> Osvětim)
Note: The above address information from the Czech Holocaust archive is uncertain and may be incorrect.

Parents:
Klinger, Rudolf (1881)
Oesterreicherová, Milada

Spouse(s):
Bocková, Elly

Children:
None

Klinger, Gustav [ b. 3.7.1871, Třebovle (Kouřim), Bohemia - d. c.1944, Auschwitz, Poland ]
The eldest son of Karel and Marie (née Lustigová) Klinger - the first of 14 known children. I have no specific information on Gustav's life, but we know he married Kamilla Pollatschková - daughter of Leopold and Katharina (née Fischelová) - on 10 June 1897 at the Hotel Robitschek in Prague. Katharina was the sister of my great-great grandmother Marie. This marital connection of course ties the Pollatscheks and Fischels into the Klinger family in two distinct but related ways.

Katharina Pollatschek's obituary indicates Gustav and Kamilla were from Nehvizdy which is directly adjacent to Čelákovice, just outside of Prague. Additionally many of Gustav's siblings worked and lived in the geographical area which stretches from Čelákovice to Kouřím.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Čelákovice
transport Cl-17 (13.01.1943 Mladá Boleslav -> Terezín)
transport Dz-1220 (15.05.1944 Terezín -> Osvětim)

Parents:
Klinger, Karel (1847)
Lustigová, Marie (1849)

Spouse(s):
Pollatschková, Kamilla

Children:
Klinger, František (1898)
Klingerová, Zdeňka (1903)


Klinger, Gustav Zdeněk [ b. 18.9.1918, Prague ? - d. 1944, Auschwitz, Poland ]
Gustav was the son of Artur and Gusti (née Kleinová) Klinger. No further information is currently available. Last residence, Boleslavská 4, Prague.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: XII
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: XVIII., Boleslausstrasse 4 [XVIII., Boleslavova 4], c/o Taussig
transport J-224 (04.12.1941 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Et-684 (23.10.1944 Terezín -> Osvětim)

Parents:
Klinger, Artur
Kleinová, Gusti

Spouses(s):
None

Children:
None

Klinger, Hanuš [ b. 8.4.1910, Kolín, Bohemia ? - d. 24.9.1944, Terezín ] Yad Vashem Page of Testimony
Hanuš was the son of Josef Klinger (1883) and Otilie née Taussiková. He had two brothers, Ferdinand and Karel (the latter changed his name to Charles Keith). Hanuš lived with his parents at the time of their deportation. He was a medical doctor. Hanuš passed away in Terezín at the age of 34, and both of his parents were murdered in Auschwitz.

Both of his brothers were able to escape to England, evidently prior to the war, where they started their own families and lived out their days. Note that Yad Vashem have posted a Page of Testimony for Hanuš under the name Jan (Czech equivalent of Hanuš or Hans) Klinger, link above. Last residence: třida Matyáše Brauna 46, Prague, an address that no longer exists.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: XVI
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: XVI., Mat. Braun Strasse 46 [XVI., tř. Matyáše Brauna 46]
transport Am-756 (24.04.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
zahynul 24.09.1944 Terezín

Parents:
Klinger, Josef (1883)
Taussiková, Ottilie

Spouse:
None

Children:
None

Klinger, Hugo (1877) [ b. 17.9.1877, Kunratice (Prague) - d. 28.10.1944, Auschwitz, Poland ]  Photograph Police Conscription Document Police Conscription Document Engagement Notice, Prager Tagblatt, 21 May 1907 Deportation Card Terezín to Auschwitz Transport Record
Hugo was the eldest child of Josef and Marie (née Fischel) Klinger.  He was a medical doctor. He lived in Ustí nad Labem, nor far from where his wife Ela originated. He married Ela Bergweinová on 6 October 1907 at the Hotel de Saxe in Prague. They subsequently returned to Ustí nad Labem and had three daughters.  Hugo and his entire family were murdered in the Holocaust. Last residence: Sámova 410, Prague.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: XIII
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: XIII., Samostrasse 410 [XIII., Sámova 410]
transport Ck-474 (22.12.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Ev-986 (28.10.1944 Terezín -> Osvětim)

Parents:
Klinger, Josef (1851)
Fischelová, Marie

Spouse(s):
Bergweinová, Ela

Children:
Klingerová, Edita
Klingerová, Gertrude
Klingerová, Mariana

Klinger, Hugo (1886) [ b. 28.12.1886, Kouřim, Bohemia - d. c.1942, Majdanek, Poland ]  Police Conscription Document
Hugo was one of 14 children belonging to Karel and Marie (née Lustigová) Klinger.  Hugo married Ida Glaserová and had one daughter who escaped persecution by the Nazis. Last residence: Žatecká 10, Prague.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: V
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: V., Saazer Gasse 10 [V., Žatecká 10]
transport Au-729 (12.05.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Ay-791 (17.05.1942 Terezín -> Lublin)

Parents:
Klinger, Karel (1847)
Lustigová, Marie (1849)

Spouse(s):
Glaserová, Ida

Children:
Klingerová, Trude


Klinger, Jan [ b. 26.5.1926, Prague? - d. 17.9.1942, Majdanek, Poland ]
Probably the only son of Anton and Anna (née Freundová) Klinger. Since there are no available birth records to confirm his identity, I've included him here as the likely son of Anton and Anna. Jan perished in Majdanek camp. Last residence, Brožíkova 892, Prague.

Poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha XIII
Adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha XIV, Brožíkova 892
Transport AAh, č. 747 (10. 06. 1942, Praha -> Ujazdow)
Zahynul 17. 09. 1942 Majdanek

Parents:
Klinger, Anton
Freundová, Anna

Spouse(s):
None

Children:
None

Klinger, Josef (1851) [ b. 1.8.1851, Šeberov (Prague) - d. 10.8.1929, Ruská 20/562, Vinohrady (Prague) ] Police Conscription Document Police Conscription Document Funeral Announcements, Prager Tagblatt Photograph Klinger Family, c.1928 Ruská 562/20 Grave in Nový Židovský Hřbitov
My great-great-grandfather. Josef was born to parents Leopold and Anna (née Löwyová) Klinger in 1851, probably in Šeberov on the outskirts of Prague. In life he was a butcher and a prominent and influential businessman in Prague. Like his father, he was a butcher. According to basic research he established what became one of the largest cattle farms in Prague well before the formation of the Czechoslovak republic. He married Marie Fischelová, presumably in Prague, on 31 October 1876.  Together they had 8 children. Josef had three siblings (Marie, Karel, and Rosa), and one additional brother who died as an infant. His Hebrew name was Pinchas, and he is buried in the Nový Židovský Hřbitov in Prague with his wife and granddaughter.

Parents:
Klinger, Leopold (1819)
Löwyová, Anna

Spouse(s):
Fischelová, Marie

Children:
Klinger, Hugo (1877)
Klingerová, Kamilla (1879)
Klinger, Rudolf (1881)
Klingerová, Pauline
Klingerová, Olga (1885)
Klingerová, Hermine (1887)
Klinger, Leopold (1890)
Klinger, Arnošt

Klinger, Josef (1883) [ b. 6.3.1883, Otice, Bohemia - d. 1944, Auschwitz, Poland ]  Police Conscription Document
Josef was one of 14 children belonging to Karel and Marie (née Lustigová) Klinger. Josef married Otilie Taussiková. Two of his three sons managed to escape persecution, but he and his wife were both killed in Auschwitz. Last residence: třida Matyáše Brauna 46, which no longer exists.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: XVI
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: XVI., Mat. Braun Strasse 46 [XVI., tř. Matyáše Brauna 46]
transport Am-754 (24.04.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Eb-519 (18.05.1944 Terezín -> Osvětim)

Parents:
Klinger, Karel (1847)
Lustigová, Marie (1849)

Spouse(s):
Taussiková, Ottilie

Children:
Klinger, Hanuš
Klinger, Ferdinand
Klinger, Karel (aka Charles Keith)

Klinger, Josef (1929) [ b. 17.11.1929, Vršovice (Prague) - d. 26.1.1943, Auschwitz, Poland ]  Deportation Card
The only son of Arnošt and Irma (née Fischelová) Klinger, Josef was named after his grandfather, who died shortly before his birth. He was only 13 years old when he was sent to the gas chambers at Auschwitz - only 4 months after he was taken from his home in Prague. The transports to Auschwitz on 26.1.1943 are considered death transports because almost nobody on those transports survived the Shoah, so the date of arrival in the camp is generally accepted to be the date of death of the victims. Last residence: Přemyslova 18, Prague, with his parents and sister.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: XIII
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: VI., Prschemyslstrasse 10 [VI., Přemyslova 10]
transport Bf-458 (08.09.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Cs-883 (26.01.1943 Terezín -> Osvětim)
Note: The above last-address information from the Czech Holocaust archive is incorrect.

Parents:
Klinger, Arnošt
Fischelová, Irma

Spouse(s):
None

Children:
None

Klinger, Karel (1847) [ b. 25.12.1847, Šeberov (Prague) - d. 25.4.1919, Prague ]  Police Conscription Document Grave in nový židovský hřbitov
Karel was the eldest son of Leopold and Anna (née Löwyová) Klinger and brother of my great-great grandfather Josef Klinger. Karel and his wife Marie (née Lustigová) were prolific and had at least 14 children. From the conscription document it appears that he was a businessman (geschaftsmann). He and his wife are buried in the New Jewish Cemetery in Prague, as are Josef and his wife. Unfortunately no additional data are currently available.

Parents:
Klinger, Leopold (1819)
Löwyová, Anna

Spouse(s):
Lustigová, Marie (1849)

Children:
Klinger, Antonin
Klinger, Arthur
Klinger, Emil

Klinger, Gustav

Klinger, Hugo (1886)
Klinger, Josef (1883)

Klinger, (Newborn)
Klinger, Otto (1889)

Klinger, Rudolf (1876)

Klingerová, Berta
Klingerová, Emilie
Klingerová, Hermine (1872)

Klingerová, Irma (1891)
Klingerová, Olga (1890)


Klinger, Karel (1919) [ b. 4.11.1919 Vršovice (Prague) - d. 25.4.1945, Kaufering, Germany ]  Deportation Card Terezín to Auschwitz transport log Dachau Camp Prisoner Record (Front) Dachau Camp Prisoner Record (Back) Kaufering prisoner card Unknown Dachau Document Dachau Prisoner Death Book
Karel was the middle of my grandmother's three brothers, born to Rudolf and Milada Klinger in Vršovice, probably at Ruská 20. As a young man he lived with his brother František in Podolí, at a villa owned by Rudolf (it's still there) but formerly inhabited by Milada's sister Hermine and her husband Gotthold Freudenfeld.  Karel was a farmer or agronomist, having studied at a farming school in Roudnice nad Labem, and no doubt worked on the Klinger family estates. His uncle Leopold and his father were both prominent cattle traders and dairy farmers in Prague and owned large tracts of farmland in Malešice and Štěrboholy.

Karel was arrested by the Gestapo on 27.1.1942 in Prague and deported to Terezín on 30.1.1942, where he languished for two-and-a-half years before being sent to Auschwitz on 28.9.1944. Like his brothers and uncle, the Nazis had plans for Karel - he was quickly deported from Auschwitz to Germany less than two weeks later, on 10.10.1944, and ended up in the Kaufering III (at Kaufering) slave labor camp. The Kaufering subsystem were among many subcamps of the Dachau concentration camp system. There he was forced to work until he died on 25.4.1945 - just days before the camp was liberated. The date of his death suggests he may have been one of thousands (along with his brother Zdeněk, who died only one day before him) to be "evacuated" from the Landsberg/Kaufering subcamps - the SS cleared the camps on 24 April on what were literally death marches toward Bad Tölz, via the Dachau main camp. Without food, water, or medicine on these forced marches, many of the prisoners who were already malnourished and weak simply expired. The death marches took place during Passover..

From the official Dachau concentration camp book:

      "Only a few days before the arrival of the American troops, the Kaufering prisoners were marched off or transported with trains in the direction of Dachau. Only those prisoners who were unfit to be transported remained behind. Many prisoners died of exhaustion, were shot by guards, or lost their lives during air raids."

Karel's prisoner card says "Sch. J." which means Schutzhaft, Jüden - a Jewish prisoner in "protective custody."  Prisoner number 116032.  Last residence: Pod Pekařkou 425, although notably his deporation card says "Podoli Přemyslova 425/12." As noted above, the original villa is still there, at Podolí 425.

Karel and his brother Zdeněk were able to stay together through Terezín, Auschwitz, and the circuit of transfers which resulted in their imprisonment and death at Kaufering III. They were also able to remain at least reasonably close to their uncle Leopold. Both brothers were assigned to barracks number 22 at Kaufering III. Also from the Dachau book, testimony from a survivor:

      "In the winter of 1944 almost all of the prisoners...in Kaufering No. 3 and No. 4 worked in the Mohl woods, building an underground factory.  Roll call with its endless beatings took place at dusk. The trip [to the site], across a bitterly cold frost, through snow, through knee-deep snow, lasted a few hours. Weakened, we reached the woods. We shivered from cold, from hunger and from exhaustion. That was only the beginning of the torture. We worked out in the open with hardly any light. People fell from the scaffolding, froze in the snow, fell into an abyss unnoticed."

poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: XV
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: XV., Peter-Aspelt-Strasse 425 [XV., Pod Pekařkou 425]
transport V-122 (30.01.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Ek-430 (28.09.1944 Terezín -> Osvětim)
Note: The above information from the Czech Holocaust archive is incomplete.

Parents:
Klinger, Rudolf (1881)
Oesterreicherová, Milada

Spouse(s):
None

Children:
None

Klinger, Leopold (1819) [ b. 1819 - Chodov (Prague) - d. 19.7.1885, Uhříněves (Prague) ] Police Conscription Document Obituary, Prager Tagblatt, 20 July 1885
Leopold was one of several children of Jakob (1783) and Theresia (née Kaufmannová) Klinger, and my 3rd-great grandfather. He married Anna Löwyová on 6 June 1845, and became the father of Karel, Josef, Rosa, Jakob, and Marie. Leopold was a butcher by trade, but is also listed in many birth records from throughout the southern Prague area as "Schützjuden" - the typical descriptor for the local mohel - or was explicitly names in those birth records as the mohel. This was also true of his father and grandfather before him. His father Jakob is similarly noted in many earlier birth records.

Leopold passed away in 1885; according to the obituary his funeral took place in Uhříněves, possibly either at home or at the tiny ceremonial facility in that cemetery. The obituary says something like "He died in Uhříněves after long suffering in the 66th year of his devout life." Evidently his wife, who survived him by almost exactly 6 years, is buried next to him. Sadly the whole of the cemetery is in bad repair, and their gravestones have gone missing.

Parents:
Klinger, Jakob (1783)
Kaufmannová, Theresia

Spouse(s):
Löwyová, Anna

Children:
Klinger, Karel (1847)
Klinger, Jakob (1849)
Klinger, Josef (1851)
Klingerová, Marie (1846)
Klingerová, Rosa


Klinger, Leopold (1890) [ b. 15.9.1890 Vršovice 18 (Prague) - d. 18.2.1945, Erpfting, Germany ] Leopold, Eliška, Marie, and Zdeňka Klinger Klinger Family, c. 1928 Štěrboholy 135 - Leopold's Villa Klinger and Vesely Memorial Deportation Card "Office" card issued at Kaufering (Dachau) concentration camp
Leopold was the second-youngest child of Josef and Marie (née Fischelová) Klinger.  He was called Polda in the family. He had a rust-colored, wooly kind of hair, and was apparently hard of hearing. He was born in Vršovice 18, and had his Brit Mila on 22.9.1890 at Vršovice 19, presumably an adjacent building. He married Eliška Veselá on 30.11.1919 at the Hotel Bristol in Prague, and they subsequently had two daughters. All of the family perished in Auschwitz.

Like his elder brother Rudolf, Leopold was a livestock trader and businessman, known for large cattle farms on the outskirts of Prague (as was Rudolf). He was a tenant in a villa in Štěrboholy, which he later purchased. That building is at Ústřední 135/15, and is now the Prague 10 municipal office. He also owned a significant amount of land in Štěrboholy which was used to manage his hundreds of head of cattle, and perhaps as investment property. Leopold and his brother Rudolf often went to Senovážné square to the crop exchange, and also to sell and arrange for the slaughter of their cattle. Reportedly he and Rudolf had a tendency to quarrel, especially when it came to their business affairs. Even as they had a difficult personal relationship, they were estranged from some of other their brothers and sisters.  Leopold was reportedly strict, authoritative, and demanding to a fairly extreme degree and Rudolf was apparently a good deal moreso.

Three weeks before they were deported, a "trustee" working for the Nazis in the Protectorate came to catalogue all of their belongings. The day they were deported, Leopold and his family were told to report to Veletržní palác, where all of the Jews were gathered. There were put on transports to the Terezín ghetto, and the real nightmare began.

Leopold, like his nephews Karel and Zdeněk Klinger, was transferred out of Auschwitz and made his way westward through the concentration camp system to serve as slave labor for the Nazis' desperate, last-ditch attempt to save their war effort - they were returned to build weapons, infrastructure, and aircraft. It appears that the three Klinger men were able to stay reasonably close together - he was transferred, along with his nephews, from Auschwitz to Kaufering III (at Kaufering) on 10 October 1944. Among other activities, healthy Jews were brought into Kaufering III from the concentration camp system in Poland to build the facilities the Nazis used to produce the Me-262 jet fighter. Leopold was later transferred to the Kaufering VII camp (at Erpfting) - originally a labor camp, but ultimately an area where sick and invalid Jewish slave laborers were deposited in horrendous conditions and left to die - on 7 January 1945, where he remained until his death, probably from typhoid, on 18 February 1945.

It is worth noting that on some Holocaust-era documents, Leopold's date of birth is listed as 1900. This is not correct. It's not clear how this happened.

The Prague city council saw fit to commission a memorial in memory of brave fighters from World War I, and to Czech Holocaust victims. The Klinger and Vesely familes, decimated by the Holocaust, have their names engraved on a small monument located across from Leopold's main villa, on part of what was Leopold's pasture land, in what is now a park and residential area.  

poslední bydliště před deportací: Štěrboholy
transport Bg-429 (12.09.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
transport El-969 (29.09.1944 Terezín -> Osvětim)
zahynul 19.03.1945 Dachau
Note: The above information from the Czech Holocaust archive is incomplete, and the date of death is incorrect.

Parents:
Klinger, Josef (1851)
Fischelová, Marie

Spouse(s):
Veselá, Eliška

Children:
Klingerová, Marie (1920)
Klingerová, Zdeňka (1922)


Klinger, Otto (1915) [ b. 11.3.1915, Prague ? - d. 1943, Auschwitz, Poland ]
Ota was the elder son of Artur and Gusti (née Kleinová) Klinger. He was a medical doctor and he perished in the Shoah, along with his step-mother and the rest of his family. No further information is currently available. Last residence, Boleslavská 4, Prague.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: XII
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: XVIII., Boleslausstrasse 4 [XVIII., Boleslavova 4], c/o Taussig
transport AAu-84 (27.07.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Dr-1072 (15.12.1943 Terezín -> Osvětim)

Parents:
Klinger, Artur
Kleinová, Gusti

Spouse(s):
None

Children:
None

Klinger, Otto (1889) [ b. 21.10.1889, Kouřim, Bohemia - d. c.1944, Auschwitz, Poland ]  Police Conscription Document
Otto was one of 14 children belonging to Karel and Marie (née Lustigová) Klinger. He married Helena Lagusová on 18 May 1919 in Karlín, but don't appear to have had any children. Last residence: Lucemburská 16, Prague.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: XII
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: XII., Luxemburger Strasse 16 [XII., Lucemburská 16]
transport Au-719 (12.05.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Ek-800 (28.09.1944 Terezín -> Osvětim)

Parents:
Klinger, Karel (1847)
Lustigová, Marie (1849)

Spouse(s):
Lagusová, Helena

Children:
None/Unknown

Klinger, Rudolf (1876) [ b. 12.4.1876, Třebovle/Kouřim, Bohemia - d. c.1942, Majdanek?, Poland ]  Police Conscription Document
Rudolf was one of 14 children belonging to Karel and Marie (née Lustigová) Klinger. Rudolf married Rudolfina Löwová on 2 November 1902 in Brno, and they appear to have had three children. Police Conscription Documents frequently list incorrect birthdates - and the birthdate of 1878 is incorrect. Curiously the 1878 date is listed in their marriage record as well. The Czech Holocaust Archive have correctly assigned the 1876 date.

Note also the Czech Holocaust archive has his sister Olga and her husband Rudolf Seidl at the same address, "care of Klinger," and Rudolf and his wife were the only Klingers in the building. We can assume from the available data that Rudolf was murdered at Majdanek, Belzec, or Sobibor, but there is no corroborating documentation that supports any one of those camps. Last residence: Kelleyova 6, Prague. The address no longer exists.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: V
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: V., Kelleygasse 6 [V., Kelleyova 6]
transport Au-717 (12.05.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Ay-749 (17.05.1942 Terezín -> Lublin)

Parents:
Klinger, Karel (1847)
Lustigová, Marie (1849)

Spouse(s):
Löwová, Rudolfina

Children:
Klinger, Ferdinand
Klinger, Paul
Klingerová, Irma (1905)

Klinger, Rudolf (1881) [ b. 23.6.1881, Šeberov (Prague) - 1.4.1942, Ruská 20/562, Vršovice (Prague) ]   Police Conscription Document Police Conscription Document Marriage Announcement, Prager Tagblatt, 25 October 1908 Rudolf's death card - Czech Archives Klinger Family, c. 1928 Rudolf Klinger death record, retreived from the Czech National Archives, January 2011. "Malešice Estate" Advertisement, 1935.
My great-grandfather and second son of Josef and Marie Klinger. Rudolf was probably born in Šeberov, in what is now Prague 4. He married Milada Oesterreicherová of Brázdim in the Hotel Bristol, Prague, on 25 October 1908. Together they had at least 5 children, including my grandmother. Unfortunately I have very little information about Rudolf, but I do know that he was a wealthy landowner and cattle trader. He had a large cattle and dairy farm in Malešice, the "Velkostatek Malešice," or Estate Malešice, where he kept a manor (see link above for an advert for Rudolf's estate). Rudolf and his brother Leopold had quite a number of real estate holdings throughout Prague, other parts of Bohemia, and in Dresden, Germany. Also like his brother Leopold, Rudolf was reportedly quarrelsome in business affairs and was estranged from his other brothers and sisters.

It is my understanding that Rudolf and my grandmother were close; she was his eldest child and only suriving daughter. He made it clear that she was forbidden to leave the country, even as the grip of the Nazi regime tightened around the Czech throat. When she elected to do so in an attempt to save my 5-year old father's life, her relationship with her father was effectively over. Rudolf passed away at Ruská 20/562 on 1 April 1942, during the occupation and near the peak of Jewish deportations to Polish death and concentration camps - on his wife's 54th birthday. According to records I located in the Czech National Archives, Rudolf was indeed cremated following his death (no Jewish burials were allowed by the Nazis). As you can see from the death record (link above), Rudolf died from acute arteriosclerosis and pulmonary edema.

Milada was deported to Terezín only a month following his passing, and she perished in the gas chamber in Auschwitz. All three of their sons died in concentration and forced-labor camps in Germany. My grandmother was the only escapee.

My grandmother was able to acquire Rudolf's ashes following her return to Czechoslovakia in late 1945.

Parents:
Klinger, Josef (1851)
Fischelová, Marie

Spouse(s):
Oesterreicherová, Milada

Children:
Klingerová, Kamilla (1909)
Klingerová, Zdeňka (1911)
Klinger, František (1915)
Klinger, Karel
Klinger, Zdeněk

Klinger, Zdeněk [ b. 11.10.1921, Vršovice (Prague) - d. 24.4.1945, Kaufering, Germany ]  Deportation Card Terezín to Auschwitz transport log Dachau Camp Prisoner Record (Front) Kaufering Prisoner Card Dachau Prisoner Death Book  
Zdeněk was the youngest child of Rudolf and Milada (née Oesterreicherová) Klinger. He was an automobile electrician by trade, until he was arrested by the Gestapo on 4 December 1941 and sent immediately to Terezín. Even with severe diabetes, apparently developed during childhood and one of the main reasons he continued to live with his parents, Zdeněk was able to survive squalor and privation in Terezín for almost three years. On 28 September 1944, Zdeněk was deported to Auschwitz, along with his brothers and uncle. Shortly thereafter - also with his brother and uncle - he was sent on to Kaufering III (at Kaufering), a Dachau subcamp. Zdeněk and his brother Karel were on the same transports, and were evidently able to stay together until their deaths. Like his brother Karel, Zdeněk nearly survived until the end of the war. He passed away on 23.4.1945, probably in the same manner as his older brother, just days before the Allies liberated Dachau.

The date of his death suggests he may have been one of thousands (along with his brother Karel who died one day after Zdeněk) to be "evacuated" from the Landsberg/Kaufering subcamps - the SS cleared the camps on 24 April on what were literally death marches toward Bad Tölz via the Dachau main camp. Without food, water, or medicine on these forced marches, many of the prisoners who were already malnourished and weak simply expired. The death marches took place during Passover..

His prisoner card says "Sch. J." which means Schutzhaft, Jüden - a Jewish prisoner in "protective custody." His prisoner number was 115238. Last residence: Ruská 20, Prague.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: XIII
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: XIII., Russische Strasse 20 [XIII., Ruská 20]
transport J-228 (04.12.1941 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Ek-147 (28.09.1944 Terezín -> Osvětim)
Note: The above information from the Czech Holocaust archive is incomplete.

Parents:
Klinger, Rudolf (1881)
Oesterreicherová, Milada

Spouse(s):
None

Children:
None

Klingerová, Berta [ b. 25.5.1875, Kouřim, Bohemia - d. c.1942, Treblinka, Poland ]  Police Conscription Document
Berta was one of 14 children of Karel and Marie (née Lustigová) Klinger.  She married Josef Ascher of Tabor on 9 December 1894 in Prague. Together they had 4 children , including a set of twins. The records and tracing are incomplete, but it's possible some of the children were Holocaust survivors. Last residence: Valdecká 659, Prague.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Horní Počernice
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: IX., Waldekergasse 659 [IX., Valdecká 659]
transport AAl-909 (02.07.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Bv-1513 (15.10.1942 Terezín -> Treblinka)

Parents:
Klinger, Karel (1847)
Lustigová, Marie (1849)

Spouse(s):
Ascher, Josef

Children:
Ascher, Bedřich
Ascher, Rudolf
Ascher, Zdeněk
Ascherová, Anna

Klingerová, Edita [ b. 9.7.1908, Ustí nad Labem, Bohemia - d. 1943, Auschwitz, Poland ] Žádost o vydání občanské legitimace - Page 1 Žádost o vydání občanské legitimace - Page 2 Deportation Card
Edita was the elder daugher of Hugo and Ela (née Bergweinová) Klinger. By the time the war rolled around she had married and divorced Arnošt Bienenfeld, about whom I've found no documentation. Her application for "General Civil Identification" shows that her former husband was an engineer, and that she was considered a "private" citizen. The same record also indicates she was a Ph.D.  It appears that she had no children, and that by the time of her deporation she had moved back in with her parents and younger sister Mariana in Prague.

The same identification form describes the following information: her physical attributes, shows that she is listed in the Jewish registry of Ustí nad Labem as of 21.7.1908 (a birth record), that she filed a housing application in 1939 in what appears to be the Hradčany district of Prague, that she was married in Ustí on 19 March 1933, and that a proof of divorce certificate exists in Litoměřice as of 27 January 1936. It also appears that she formerly lived in Plzeň, presumably with her former husband.  Edita perished in Auschwitz. Last residence: Sámova 410, Prague.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: XIII
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: XIII., Samostrasse 410 [XIII., Sámova 410]
transport Ck-473 (22.12.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Dn/a-3 (05.10.1943 Terezín -> Osvětim)

Parents:
Klinger, Hugo (1877)
Bergweinová, Ela

Spouse(s):
Bienenfeld, Arnošt (divorced)

Children:
None


Klingerová, Emilie [ b. 15.12.1888, Kouřim, Bohemia - d. ? ]
Emilie was the tenth of 14 children born to Karel and Marie (née Lustigová) Klinger. She married Arthur Lustig - her first cousin - on 14 April 1907 at the Hotel Bristol in Prague. Together they had at least one child. Currently their fates are unknown.

Parents:
Klinger, Karel (1847)
Lustigová, Marie (1849)

Spouse(s):
Lustig, Arthur

Children:
Lustig, Jiří Bedřich František

Klingerová, Gertrude [ b. 12.4.1912, Dlouhá 5, Ústí nad Labem, Bohemia - d. 1942, Sobibor, Poland ]  
Gertrude was the middle daughter of Dr. Hugo and Ela (née Bergweinová) Klinger. She was born in at Dlouhá 5 in Ústí nad Labem. Based on newly-available data from the Ústí Jewish registers, we know that our Gertrude married Karel Heller in the Klausen Synagogue in Prague on 27 September 1936, and that she was lost in the Shoah with the rest of her family. There are two Truda Hellerovás in the Czech Holocaust Archive who have the same birthdate, but the following information describes our Truda:

Narozena 12. 04. 1912
poslední bydliště před deportací: Kouřim
transport AAb, č. 389 (05.06.1942 Kolín -> Terezín)
transport AAk, č. 532 (12.06.1942 Terezín -> Trawniki)

Parents:
Klinger, Hugo (1877)
Bergweinová, Ela

Spouse(s):
Heller, Karel

Children:
Heller, Petr


Klingerová, Helena [ b. 20.9.1925, Vršovice (Prague) - d. 26.1.1943, Auschwitz, Poland ] Deportation Card rt record - Page 1/2 rt record - Page 2/2
Helena was the only daughter of Arnošt and Irma (née Fischelová) Klinger.  She was deported along with her parents and brother to Terezín, and then to Auschwitz where they all perished. The transports to Auschwitz on 26.1.1943 are considered death transports because almost nobody on those transports survived the Shoah. Helena was only 17 when she was murdered in a Auschwitz gas chamber. Last residence: Přemyslová 18, Prague.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: XIII
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: XIII., Maltschgasse 18 [XIII., Malšská 18]
transport Bf-459 (08.09.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Cs-884 (26.01.1943 Terezín -> Osvětim)
Note: The above last-address information from the Czech Holocaust archive is incorrect.

Parents:
Klinger, Arnošt
Fischelová, Irma

Spouse(s):
None

Children:
None

Klingerová, Hermine (1872) [ b. c.1872, Kouřim, Bohemia - d. ? ] Police Conscription Document
Hermine was one of 14 children belonging to Karel and Marie (née Lustigová) Klinger. She married Simon Stein on 11 September 1892 at the Karlín Synagogue.  I believe she perished in the Holocaust, but no informatoin on her fate is available. I'm currently investigating. Based on her grandfather's obituary, it appears she had a son called Friedrich (Czech: Bedřich) Stein.

Other notes: Deportation to Łódź (a Jewish ghetto created by the Nazis) is noteworthy. Deportation of Czech Jews had barely begun at this early date. Łódź was the first eastward destination for many Jews from Czechoslovakia; many of those who ended up there were subsequently deported to the death camp at Chelmno where they were asphyxiated by truck exhaust in the back of crude "gas vans." Many others died in the squalid, disease-ridden ghetto from acute malnutrition or any of a number of illnesses. The Chelmno (also known as Kulmhof) death camp became operational in December, 1941.

Possibly the same Hermína Steinová:
narozena 17.12.1873
poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: X
transport D-962 (31.10.1941 Praha -> Lodž)

Parents:
Klinger, Karel (1847)
Lustigová, Marie (1849)

Spouse(s):
Stein, Simon

Children:
Stein, Bedřich


Klingerová, Hermine (1887) [ b. 15.9.1887, Karlín 94 (Prague) - d. 1966, Tel Aviv, Israel ] Police Conscription Document Arnold and Hermina Hájek
A daughter of Josef and Marie Klinger. She married Arnold Hájek on 1 April 1906 at the Hotel Bristol in Prague. Among other places, they lived in Holešovice (formerly Holešice) in Prague. They had two sons and a daughter, and the entire family left Czechoslovakia prior to the Holocaust. Some of the family ended up in Israel and some went to Australia, and many of them have spent the intervening years focused on property and reparations, but curiously with no meaningful interest in the family beyond financial aspects. There are living descendants in both Israel and Australia.

Parents:
Klinger, Josef (1851)
Fischelová, Marie

Spouse(s):
Hájek, Arnold

Children:
Hájek, Jiři
Hájek, František
Hájková, Alice


Klingerová, Kamilla (1879) [ b. 2.5.1879, Karlín 57 (Prague) - d. 7.12.1907, Prague ] Police Conscription Document Police Conscription Document Obituary, Prager Tagblatt, 13 December 1907 Verstorbene, Prager Tagblatt, 12 December 1907 Danksagung, Prager Tagblatt, 14 December 1907
Kamilla was the eldest daughter of Josef and Marie (née Fischelová) Klinger. She married Julius Haim at the Hotel Bristol in Prague on 7 October 1900, and as far as I'm aware they had no children. Kamilla died very young, but was revered in the family; the list of in-laws and relatives in her obituaries is extensive and very informative. Besides her brothers and sisters, her parents-in-law (Emanuel and Arnoštka Haim), her sisters-in-law (Paula Neumannová, Anna Silbersternová, Ella Klingerová, and Marie and Berta Haimová), and other in-laws (Emil Haim, Oskar Neumann, Emil Kummermann, Adolf Fuchs, Arnold Hájek, Siegmund Silberstern, and Josef and Rudolf Haim) are all noted.

Kamilla was popular and loved by many people judging by the tenor of the obituary and of the follow-up listing in the 14 December 1907 newspaper piece. The 14 December announcement includes thanks to two doctors, Dr. Ernst Weitzbarth and Dr. Julius Kellner for their "loving treatment," as well as important and notable recognitions by the Jewish Community of Michle and the Jubilee Synagogue in Prague.

Parents:
Klinger, Josef (1851)
Fischelová, Marie

Spouse(s):
Haim, Julius

Children:
None


Klingerová, Kamilla (1909) [ b. 31.1.1909, Vršovice (Prague) - d. 22.8.1994, Florida, USA ] Police Conscription Document 
My grandmother.  The only surviving chlid of Rudolf and Milada Klinger, and the only Shoah escapee or survivor from her immediate family.  My family always knew her as "Milda," a curious twist on her mother's name. Like many other Czech grandmothers or elder women, we grew up calling her "Babi." She married my grandfather Otto Günstling on 17.2.1932 in a civil ceremony in Staroměstská in Prague, and later had my father - an only child.

In 1939, my grandmother was able to secure a way out of the country (using her considerable wealth, apparently) with my father in tow, and they escaped to England as part of a ~14,000 person stable of expatriates under the protection of the British government (See this page for more information).  While they certainly traveled with Otto Fischer (b. 16.11.1906 in Rychnov nad Kněžnou), Fischer and my grandmother apparently did not marry until May or June of 1944, in England. They were married in a civil service and evidently stayed together through the war.

It's worth nothing that while in England my grandmother maintained her contacts with the Masaryk family, particularly Jan and Alice Masaryk, as well as one of my grandfather's second cousins, Elsa Günstlingová (also a Jewish refugee in England from 1939 onward), from Prague but an Austrian expatriate. My grandmother kept in contact with Alice until the latter passed away in the United States in the 1960's. According to my records, Elsa Günstling died in London on 3 October 1948 at about 67 years of age.

With the assistance of my grandmother's auntie and step-uncle, Pavla and Karel Kropáček, my grandmother and father returned to Czechoslovakia in October of 1945. They were preceded by Otto Fischer who had settled in at Ruská 20 about a month earlier. At some point after October 1945 my grandmother and Fischer had a divorce, but not before he evidently adopted my father, whose name was changed to Fischer in 1946. It's not clear what the exact circumstances were. Fischer returned to England where he was naturalized, and he remarried Eliška Adler in 1947. I believe they had at least one son who is still living in London. My father has also mentioned having a cousin, but it's not clear who this might have been as all of Pavla's children were evidently lost in the Shoah. Pavla herself may have been interned in Terezín for some time before being released, but it also appears she converted to some form of Christianity and may have been spared that terror. [A side note about the Kropáček connection: Tomáš Masarýk's mother was born Therezie Kropáčková, and my grandmother's husband Karl Kropáček, a Roman Catholic, may have been related to her.] During this brief return to Czechoslovakia, my grandmother and father also stayed at Štěrboholy 4, which at that time was part of Leopold's former villa at the Ústřední 135 property. At some point between late 1945 and early 1948 my grandmother and father apparently lived in a flat at Pšstrossova 11 (Now Anny Letenské 11) in Vinohrady - just next to other Günstling-family properties.

When the Communists overtook Czechoslovakia in 1948, my grandmother was again compelled to leave the country. According to some second-hand information I received, in 1948 she was issued a permit to travel to Paraguay and she did so very quickly.  My father reported that he and his mother were stopped by the Communists on the absolute last transport out of the country and that they nearly didn't get out, even though they had travel papers. Around this time my grandmother remarried for a third time - by some simple civil document or administrative process - to a Czech Jew named Jaroslav Burian. Apparently Burian was a friend of one of her brothers, and she married him to facilitate his escape from the country. The three may have traveled through France, and then onto South America. My father and grandmother ended up in Caracas, Venezuela and surrounding areas where they survived for a number of years before coming to the United States.  Eventually my father was sponsored by some of my grandmother's friends in the U.S., and he was able to emigrate, finish high school, become naturalized, join the military, and finally to graduate from university with a bachelor's and a master's degree. My grandmother divorced Burian in absentia in 1961, and worked as a travel agent in Florida. For the rest of her life she traveled around the world, and even lived in Nice, France for some years. She returned to the United States in about 1990 and lived in Florida until her death in 1994 from acute coronary disease. She was a lifetime smoker and used to consume Pall Mall nonfilters and coffee in seeming perpetuity.

I have very fond memories of visiting my grandmother in Florida, and of her coming to visit our family in California, the latter fairly regularly. When we were little, Babi used to let my sister and me pack her cigarettes into her silver cigarette case. Pall Mall cigarettes have a very distinctive smell and so did her plain, brushed metal Zippo lighter. She used to drink black coffee and not much else, and didn't like or was allergic to milk (curious for someone who came from a family of cattle farmers). I also remember that my grandmother had beautiful, elegant hands with long, slender fingers. She was extreme and detailed in her care for her fingernails, and they were immaculate. She traveled with a small kit for maintaining them, and I remember seeing her execute the ritual on a number of occasions. You've never seen a more perfect set of natural fingernails in your life. Interestingly, everyone else in my family is quite attentive to their fingernails. My grandmother remains one of my greatest heroes.

Parents:
Klinger, Rudolf (1881)
Oesterreicherová, Milada

Spouse(s):
Günstling, Otto (divorced)
Fischer, Otto (divorced)
Burian, Jaroslav (divorced)

Children:
Günstling, Petr

Klingerová, Mariana [ b. 10.7.1918, Prague, Bohemia - d. 26.10.1942, Auschwitz, Poland ] Deportation Card Terezín to Auschwitz transport record - Page 1/2 Terezín to Auschwitz transport record - Page 2/2
Mariana was the youngest daughter of Hugo and Ela (née Bergweinová) Klinger.  Mariana was a seamstress, or an apprentice to same. She was arrested by the Gestapo in Prague on 24 October 1942 and sent directly to Terezín. She was then swiftly deported to Auschwitz on 26 October 1942 where she was immediately sent to the gas chamber. Last residence: Sámova 410, Prague.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: XIII
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: XIII., Samostrasse 410 [XIII., Sámova 410]
transport Ca-618 (24.10.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
transport By-1621 (26.10.1942 Terezín -> Osvětim)

Parents:
Klinger, Hugo (1877)
Bergweinová, Ela

Spouse(s):
None

Children:
None

Klingerová, Marie (1846) [ b. 21.8.1846, Šeberov 13 (Prague) - d. 14.6.1892, Uhřiněves (Prague) ] Obituary, Prager Tagblatt, 14 June 1892 Obituary, Prager Tagblatt, 14 June 1892
The eldest child of Leopold and Anna (née Löwyová) Klinger, and the sister of my great-great-grandfather Josef. Marie married Moritz Rezek and they had at least 10 children. She is buried in the Uhřiněves Jewish cemetery along with both of her parents, her husband, and other Rezeks who are probably family members. I have visited the cemetery on a few occasions and have posted some of those old photographs here. Unfortunately the cemetery is in quite a state of disrepair and many headstones have been vandalized and/or stolen; as a result we were unable to locate most of the Klinger and Rezek graves. No further information is currently available.

Notes:

1) The obituary incorrectly lists one of her sisters-in-law as Marie née Polaček, wife of her brother Karel. It's not clear how this mistake could have come to pass. Every other name is consistent with the rest of the family tree. Other obituaries for immediate family members have her brothers' respective spouses listed correctly, and no other records anywhere show anyone but Marie Lustig as Karel's one and only wife.

2) Moritz and Marie's family connects the Lustig I and Lustig II lines on this family tree, as well as bridging the Klinger and Rezek families. Her daughter Karolina married Samuel Lustig, son of Bernard Lustig, while Marie's siblings Karel and Rosa Klinger married two children of Simon Lustig. It is not clear if the lines of Bernard and Simon are blood relatives, but it's at least a possibility. The following facts increase the probability that Bernard and Simon are relatives, possibly brothers: a) they are only 7 years apart and b) Bernard was married in Kolín in 1848 & Simon lived in Kouřim around the same time. Those towns are close to one another and many other Klinger relatives lived, worked, and died in both places.

Parents:
Klinger, Leopold (1819)
Löwyová, Anna

Spouse:
Rezek, Moritz

Children:
Rezek, Josef
Rezek, Oskar
Rezková, Camilla
Rezková, Emilie
Rezková, Hermine
Rezková, Ida
Rezková, Karoline
Rezková, Leopoldine
Rezková, Mathilde
Rezková, Theresa


Klingerová, Marie (1920) [ b. 12.9.1920, Štěrboholy 4 (Prague) - d. 26.1.1943, Auschwitz, Poland ] Maruška Klingerová Maruška and Nunka Klingerová Maruška and Nunka Klingerová Eliška, Maruška, and Nunka Klingerová Maruška Klingerová Leopold, Eliška, Marie, and Zdeňka Klinger Deportation Card
The elder daughter of Leopold and Eliška Klinger. In the family Marie was known as Maruška. She lived at home with her parents and sister until they were deported to Terezín on 12 September 1942. The family were separated during the deportations from Terezín, and Marie and her sister Zdeňka were sent to Auschwitz on 26 January 1943 where they were immediately "selected" for the gas chamber.  The transports to Auschwitz on 26.1.1943 are considered "death transports" because almost nobody on those transports survived the Shoah.  Last residence: Štěrboholy 135, Prague.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Štěrboholy
transport Bg-431 (12.09.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Cs-233 (26.01.1943 Terezín -> Osvětim)

Parents:
Klinger, Leopold (1890)
Veselá, Eliška

Spouse(s):
None

Children:
None


Klingerová, Olga (1885) [ b. 16.8.1885, Karlín 94 (Prague) - d. 1942, probably at Majdanek, Poland ] Police Conscription Document Residency Application, Page 1 Residency Application, Page 2 Olga Fuchsová (Restored) Deportation Card
Olga Fuchsová (Restored)A daughter of Josef and Marie (née Fischelová) Klinger. She married Adolf Fuchs on 5 April 1903 at the Karlín Synagogue in Prague, but they resided in Brno, Moravia (now part of Czech Republic) until probably after Adolf's 1927 passing. They had two children. The Czech Holocaust archive has her at "NC 410" which is a refrerence to Vršovice 410; this is a roundabout way of saying she lived at Sámova 410 in Vršovice, at the residence of her brother Hugo and his family. The Klinger siblings were deported from Prague to the concentration camps in Poland on different transports and on different dates, but it's known that Olga's daughter Marta was a survivor or escapee. Last residence, Sámova 410, Prague.

I have restored a photo of Olga from her residency permit application, displayed at left and linked above (original is in the application).




Narozena 16.8.1885
poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: XIII
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: XIII., NC 410
transport Am-550 (24.04.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Az-908 (25.05.1942 Terezín -> Lublin)

Parents:
Klinger, Josef (1851)
Fischelová, Marie

Spouse(s):
Fuchs, Adolf

Children:
Fuchs, Karel
Fuchsová, Marta

Klingerová, Olga (1890) [ b. 13.12.1890, Kouřím or Pečky, Bohemia - d. 10.09.1942, Chelmno, Poland ]  Police Conscription Document
Olga was one of 14 children of Karel and Marie (née Lustigová) Klinger. She married Dr. Rudolf Seidl and they lived in the same Prague building as her brother Rudolf and his wife.  There was no evident holdover at Terezín for either Olga or her husband - they were deported from Prague directly to the Łódź ghetto, and Olga was finally executed at the Chelmno death camp in 1942.  Rudolf died in the ghetto, and the fate of their daughter is unknown at this time. Last residence: Kelleyova 6, Prague. The address no longer exists.

Other notes: Deportation to Łódź (a Jewish ghetto created by the Nazis) is noteworthy. Deportation of Czech Jews had only begun at this early date. Łódź was the first eastward destination for many Jews from Czechoslovakia; many of those who ended up there were subsequently deported to the death camp at Chelmno where they were asphyxiated by truck exhaust piped in the back of crude "gas vans." Many others died in the squalid, disease-ridden ghetto from acute malnutrition or any number of other possible illnesses. The Chelmno (also known as Kulmhof) death camp became operational in December, 1941.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha: V
adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha: V., Kelleygasse 6 [V., Kelleyova 6], c/o Klinger
transport C-928 (26.10.1941 Praha -> Lodž)

Parents:
Klinger, Karel (1847)
Lustigová, Marie (1849)

Spouse(s):
Seidl, Dr. Rudolf

Children:
Seidlová, Getruda

Klingerová, Pauline [ b. 5.12.1882, Karlín 57 (Prague) - d. Ruská 18, Prague(?) ]  Police Conscription Document Police Conscription Document Police Conscription Document Police Conscription Document Engagement Notice, Prager Tagblatt, 4 March 1902 Terezín Internment Document (Front) Terezín Internment Document (Back)
A daughter of Josef and Marie Klinger, she was known as Pavla in the family.  Pavla's first husband was Emil Kummermann, whom she married at the Hotel Bristol in prague on 31 May 1902. She had two children with Emil. According to police conscription documents, she lived in Kutná Hora at some point, presumably with Emil who was from Lomec (a tiny village in the same area). Evidently there was a divorce c.1914. At some later date she married Karl Kropáček, an engineer by trade and a Roman Catholic. I am fairly certain she remained married to Karl until well after the war and possibly until her death.  Evidently both of Pavla's children were killed in the Shoah. Pavla was interned in the Terezín Ghetto on 7.11.1941 under category "Jüdin," but she was not deported to any other death or concentration camp, probably because of her marriage to a Roman Catholic.  She was later released, whether during or after the war is not clear, and returned to Ruská 18 in Vršovice. Note: In our family "mixed" marriages were rare in the extreme, but I have read that during those horrible times women sometimes agreed to reject their Judaism in order to save their own lives or the lives of their children.  My father apparently visited and stayed with her at some point following the war. Ruská 18 was a property also owned by my great-grandfather, and was just across the way from his home at Ruská 20.

There is also the anomalous "third" daughter, Vlasta, listed on the conscription record. It's certain that Vlasta is not her daughter because we know 1) the date of birth is 1920 - long after Pavla and Emil were divorced and b) that she is almost certainly Emil's step-daughter from his marriage to second wife Leopoldine née Fleischnerová. Vlasta was her daughter with first husband Jaroslaus Fleischner. Based on the available records, we know Vlasta must have married a Kummermann, but we don't know which one. Curious that she would come to live with Pavla and her family, if we assume as much based on the conscription record.

Parents:
Klinger, Josef (1851)
Fischelová, Marie

Spouse(s):
Kummermann, Emil (divorced)
Kropáček, Karel

Children
:
Kummermann, Zdeněk
Kummermannová, Marta

Klingerová, Rosa [ b. 8.7.1856, Kunratice 24 (Prague) - d. 17.2.1930, Kadaň, Bohemia ] Police Conscription Document Obituary, Prager Tagblatt, 18 February 1930
Rosa was the second daughter and youngest child of Leopold and Anna (née Löwy) Klinger, and the sister of my great-great-grandfather Josef.  Little is known other than that she married Josef Lustig at the Kunratice Synagogue on 22 December 1875, and that they had no fewer than 11 children. According to her obituary, Rosa passed away in Kadaň after a long illness. She is buried in the Kadaň Jewish cemetery.

Parents:
Klinger, Leopold (1819)
Löwyová, Anna

Spouse(s):
Lustig, Josef (1851)

Children:
Lustig, Emil (1882)
Lustig, Hugo (1876)
Lustig, Karel (1895)
Lustig, Leo
Lustig, Otto (1878)
Lustig, Wilhelm
Lustigová, Irma (1900)
Lustigová, Kamilla
Lustigová, Marie (1890)
Lustigová, Mina
Lustigová, Olga (1884)

Klingerová, Tatjana [ b. 14.12.1920, Prague? - d. 1942, Majdanek, Poland ]
Probably the only daughter of Anton and Anna (née Freundová) Klinger. Since there are no available birth records to confirm her identity, I've included her here as the likely daughter of Anton and Anna. Tatjana probably perished in Majdanek camp, as apparently all of the Jews on the "AAh" transport (the so-called Heydrich transport) were delivered there. Last residence, Brožíkova 892, Prague.

Poslední bydliště před deportací: Praha XIII
Adresa/místo registrace v Protektorátu: Praha XIV, Brožíkova 892
Transport AAh, č. 746 (10. 06. 1942, Praha -> Ujazdow)
Zahynula

Parents:
Klinger, Anton
Freundová, Anna

Spouse(s):
None

Children:
None

Klingerová, Zdeňka (1911) [ b. 21.7.1911, Vršovice 490 (Prague) - d. 21.12.1919, Vršovice (Prague) ]  Police Conscription Document 
The younger daughter of Rudolf and Milada Klinger. She was known as Zdeňička in the family. Zdeňka died when she was 8 years old, and is buried with her grandparents in the New Jewish Cemetery in Prague. According to the record of death, she died from acute osteomyelitis and sepsis. Note the incorrect birthdate on the police conscription document.

Parents:
Klinger, Rudolf (1881)
Oesterreicherová, Milada

Spouse(s):
None

Children:
None

Klingerova, Zdeňka (1922) [ b. 23.9.1922, Štěrboholy 4 (Prague) - d. 26.1.1943, Auschwitz, Poland ]  Maruška and Nunka Klingerová Maruška and Nunka Klingerová Eliška, Maruška, and Nunka Klingerová Nunka Klingerová and cousin Jiři Lederer Nunka Klingerová and friends 30.10.1941 Nunka Klingerová and cousin Jiři Lederer Deportation Card
The younger of two daughters of Leopold and Eliška Klinger. In the family Zdeňka was called Nunka. Zdeňka lived at home with her parents and sister until they were all deported to Terezín on 12 September 1942. The family were separated during the deportations to Poland, and Zdeňka and her sister Marie were sent to Auschwitz on 26 January 1943 where they were immediately "selected" for the gas chamber.  The transports to Auschwitz on 26.1.1943 are considered death transports because almost nobody on those transports survived the Shoah.  Last residence: Štěrboholy 135, Prague.

poslední bydliště před deportací: Štěrboholy
transport Bg-432 (12.09.1942 Praha -> Terezín)
transport Cs-234 (26.01.1943 Terezín -> Osvětim)

Parents:
Klinger, Leopold (1890)
Veselá, Eliška

Spouse(s):
None

Children:
None


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